Tue, May 17

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The Porch

Happy Hour: Big Cedar Fever, Pat Reedy

Join us at The Porch for a country western happy hour with Big Cedar Fever and Pat Reedy on Tuesday, May 17th from 7-9pm. $5 Suggested Donation for the bands.

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Happy Hour: Big Cedar Fever, Pat Reedy

Time & Location

May 17, 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

The Porch, 129 E Hopkins St, San Marcos, TX 78666, USA

About the event

Join us at The Porch for a country western happy hour with Big Cedar Fever and Pat Reedy on Tuesday, May 17th from 7-9pm.  This is a FREE SHOW but we encourage to support independent artists with a $5 suggested donation.

BIG CEDAR FEVER 7PM

Big Cedar Fever is a three piece swing string band out of Central Texas that specializes in classic western swing and jazz. Three part harmonies and tight musical arrangements draw listeners in, only to be taken away by the classic style and lyrics that relic another time and place.

https://www.bigcedarfever.com/

PAT REEDY 8PM

www.patreedymusic.com

Pat Reedy makes honest honky-tonk music for the modern world, mixing twang, blue-collar songwriting, working-class pride, and an unconventional backstory into albums like 2018's That's All There Is. 

That's All There Is was written during breaks in Reedy's construction job, with lyrics scribbled down on scraps of paper and discarded pieces of wood. Maybe that's why these songs — with their warm, rough-around-the-edges charm — sound different than the contemporary country-pop hits recorded in Reedy's adopted hometown of Nashville. In a city full of Hollywood cowboys and wannabe outlaws, Reedy is the real deal, more influenced by the artists whose filled the airwaves during his childhood years — including Dwight Yoakam, Mark Chesnutt, and George Jones — than anything in today's mainstream. 

Years before he moved to Nashville, a 21 year-old Reedy cut his teeth on the street corners of New Orleans. He quickly became one of the city's busiest street buskers, strumming songs for the locals on Lower Decatur and the tourists on Bourbon Steet. Those performances became the launching pad for his career, and although Reedy eventually graduated to proper venues, he never forgot the lessons learned during his roadside gigs. 

"It taught me how to really sell a song," he says of his busking history. "How to draw a crowd, too. And, occasionally, how to fend off drunks."

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